Critic reviews of

Chakravyuh  (2012 - Hindi)

Chakravyuh cumulative rating: 3.15 out of 53.15/5 (147 users)

Chakravyuh critics rating: 2.55 out of 5 2.55/5 (19 critics)

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Chakravyuh critic reviews & ratings

 

Chakravyuh is, ultimately, a victim of typical Bollywood excesses

There are films that try to tell emotionally complex stories and succeed in making an impact. Chakravyuh, unfortunately, is not one of those films. The plot, inspired by actual news stories from the past two years, seems interesting enough. Adil Khan (Rampal), a highly-ranked police officer, is transferred to Nandighat, a seemingly fictional village in the heart of the Red Corridor, after a band of Naxalites led by the charismatic Rajan (Bajpayee) massacres 84 policemenmore

CHAKRAVYUH is an engaging drama

In an era dominated by entertainers and remakes, with almost every film-maker eyeing the 100 cr Club, very few film-makers have taken the courageous route of tackling issues plaguing our society, narrating stories that seem to mirror the reality. Prakash Jha is a frontrunner in this category. From DAMUL to AARAKSHAN, Jha has raised pertinent questions through his movies. CHAKRAVYUH focuses on the Naxalite movement, besides focusing on the plightmore

DESPITE ITS FLAWS, CHAKRAVYUH PUNCHES NAMAK HARAAM WITH NAXALS

Chakravyuh, at the very beginning, sets the record straight, claiming that every event and every character in the film is inspired from real life. “Nothing is coincidental,” claims the opening disclaimer. A little later, however, a song titled Mehngai where everyone from Tata to Bata, Ambani to Birla is painted as a rogue out to rob the common man is dismissed as being “coincidental”. And that’s where Chakravyuh’s problem lies, for this is a filmmore

Chakravyuh's prologue tells you how the Naxalite movement is fast eating into our social fabric. Like most wars fought between the haves and have-nots, this one is being fought with the police (read administration) on the one hand and the Naxalites on the other - and it's gained gargantuan proportions. Today, this movement is so wide-spread, India and her rulers should no longer adopt an escapist attitudemore

Chakravyuh touches the right chords

A socio-political thriller set in the country’s red corridor where Maoist insurgents oppose industrialisation because it leads to the displacement of the tribal population, Chakravyuh has its heart in the right place. Jha has once again woven fictional elements and characters with real incidents and people to present a film that touches the right chords. But somewhere along the way, he succumbs to what can only be described as the Bollywood'isation'more

Chakravyuh is just your average action flick

A dramatised account of real events is effective so long it is both expressive and informative in a sensible measure. But Prakash Jha's Chakravyuh, which builds its nucleus around the Naxalite activities in East of India, employs familiar ploys and plot points to credibly work as either. Unlike Lal Salaam or Hazaaron Khwaishein Aisi, (human stories set against the same milieu) Chakravyuh maintains an aggressive cinematic tone with sufficient stock of blood and actionmore

Chakravyuh' talks of the growing ‘red corridor’ in several parts of the country, and how it came to be, and how it is playing out right here, right now. It is the latest in Prakash Jha’s line of films which puts the spotlight on a burningly important issue, but which comes off less than trenchant because of mainstream considerations. How else can you do naxalism and 'mao-wadi-ism’ and idealism and pragmatism, and still expect to entice multiplex viewers?more

"Becket" beckons Bollywood once again. The immortal French play by Jean Anouilh was furnished with a sensitive renewability by Hrishikesh Mukherjee in the 1973 movie Namak Haraam and then again by Govind Nihalani in Dev (2004). Now the story of two friends, separated by caste, creed and ideology, who are torn apart by their irreconcilable socio-political differences, is given a seriously spunky spin by Prakash Jha in Chakravyuhmore

The world of Naxal drama

Apply some balm for instant calm. So, an upright cop marches straight up to a villager, looks at his gangrenous leg and applies soothing cream. And hey, as if in a dream, the cop wins over an entire hostile hamlet to his side. Woe betide, if life were that simple there would be no unrest in the nation. Really. Indeed Chakravyuh, Prakash Jha’s attempt at a political drama yet again, is simplistic to a fault. As is his wont, he lambastes the establishmentmore

When films are made on real life issues, it should be either realistic or entertaining. Far from being perfect, Prakash Jha's Chakravyuh looks like an amateurish attempt. The film is based on the problem of the Naxalite movement in the country. Arjun Rampal plays a cop, SP Adil Khan who accepts the posting in one of the most sensitive areas that's under the scanner of the naxalites. This is a dreaded zone, where no other police officer is willing to get transferredmore

Gritty but inconsistent middle-of-the-road film

Prakash Jha deserves applause just for the fact that he's made a commercial film about the Naxalite movement in India. Such subjects are best reserved for news articles and documentries. But Chakravyuh successfully uses this socially relevant subject and weaves it with a run of the mill story. That predictability is the only and the major problem with this gritty film. If you've ever read a Tehelka article on the Naxalite movement in Indiamore

A drab attempt

A drab attempt at turning what hits the headlines with alarming frequency these days – the bloody Naxal movement vs the apathetic Indian state. A bunch of Naxalites led by Rajan (Manoj Bajpayee), Juhi (Anjali Patil) and Lala (Murli Sharma) are up in arms (quite literally) against the land grabbing by business giant Mahanta (Kabir Bedi) in the name of development. The government is unfortunately peopled solely by power-lusty menmore

Chakravyuh' talks of the growing ‘red corridor’ in several parts of the country, and how it came to be, and how it is playing out right here, right now. It is the latest in Prakash Jha’s line of films which puts the spotlight on a burningly important issue, but which comes off less than trenchant because of mainstream considerations. How else can you do naxalism and 'mao-wadi-ism’ and idealism and pragmatism, and still expect to entice multiplex viewers?more

Chakravyuh tries to grapple with too many nexuses in the movie

Adil Khan (Arjun Rampal), Rhea Menon (Esha Gupta) and Kabir (Abhay Deol) are friends at the police training institute. But Kabir’s tempestuous ways gets him kicked out of the program. Years later, Adil decides to take up a posting in a dreaded Naxal infested area where the Mahanta Group is trying to kick start their mining project. Even with all his honest efforts, Adil only ends up getting ambushed at the hands of the Naxal leader Rajan (Manoj Bajpayee)more

‘Chakravyuh’ is an honest attempt to decode Maoism

Prakash Jha’s filmmaking career, right from the village-level caste politics of Damul (Bonded Until Death, 1984) to the caste reservation-based drama Aarakshan (2011), has been driven by his interest in Indian politics. His most recent film is no different. With Chakravyuh, however, Jha moves away from his two long-term preoccupations – the politics of post-1970s Bihar and the changing role of caste in Indian socio-political lifemore

‘Chakravyuh’ is the closest cinema could get to Maoism

“Becket” beckons Bollywood once again. The immortal French play by Jean Anouilh was furnished with a sensitive renewability by Hrishikesh Mukherjee in the 1973 movie Namak Haraam and then again by Govind Nihalani in Dev (2004). Now the story of two friends, separated by caste, creed and ideology, who are torn apart by their irreconcilable socio-political differences, is given a seriously spunky spin by Prakash Jha in Chakravyuhmore

CHAKRAVYUH IS ENGAGING

Prakash Jha is back with a film on yet another hot issue picked up from the modern Indian history syllabus and inspired by the Mahabharata. Like an eager teacher, he presents his facts well, but the duration of the lecture is slightly more than what average students could probably stand. Coming on the heels of a glossy release (Student Of The Year), Jha’s effort might not get 100% attendance, but is still worth a watchmore

Less drama, more action, good performances

One has to still acknowledge that when compared to his last film 'Aarakshan', Prakash Jha does more than just scratches the surface with 'Chakravyuh'. Also, his conviction in telling this tale is more than apparent. This is established in the way he spins around the tale, hence picking up from newspaper headlines and other research material and keeping the narrative intact for most part of this 150 minutes long film. Yes, there was scope to go further downmore

Prakash Jha picks a sensitive subject of social relevance but in his attempt to pander to popular cinema, he incorporates too many Bollywoodisms that prevent 'Charavyuh' from becoming an intense political drama. Jha spends too much time trying to make the film entertaining rather than focus on the nuances that make a coherent plot.'Chakravyuh' is a political drama set against the backdrop of the Naxal Movement. Jha brings to forth many pertinent aspectsmore